Octopus and my warm braised octopus salad

27 Mar Afbeeldingjjjj 038

Octopus and my warm braised octopus salad20140327-150735.jpgWhat is an Octopus?

Octopuses are cephalopods similar to squid (also called calamari) and
are considered seafood with some of the properties of fish, but with
an entirely different taste and texture. The most commonly eaten part
is the arms, and sometimes the mantle (head area). Small octopuses are
eaten whole. Octopus is a common ingredient in sushi, as well as fish
soups and pastas, and is occasionally eaten live, as well as fried,
boiled, baked, grilled and so forth. Older, larger octopuses can be
tough if they are not prepared properly.
20140327-150840.jpgThe Health Benefits of Octopuses

Octopus is a low calorie, lean seafood, making it a good way to get
protein in your diet without adding too much fat. There are
approximately 140 calories per 3 oz. (85g) of octopus, with only 1.8g
of fat. Octopus is a very good source of iron, which is a common
deficiency leading to weakness, fatigue and anemia.

Octopus is also a source of calcium, potassium, phosphorus and
selenium. It provides several important vitamins including vitamin C,
vitamin A and several B vitamins, as well as some omega-3 fatty acids.
Omega-3 is an important nutrient, which may decrease the chances of
heart disease, as well as cancer and depression. It also seems to
boost the immune system and aid in brain development in children.Afbeeldingjjjj 039Octopus also contains taurine, which is an organic acid that acts as
an antioxidant, and may protect against some of the stressful effects
of exercise. Taurine is also suspected to help prevent heart disease,
some studies have also linked it with improved blood sugar levels.

My warm braised octopus salad recipe

Ingrediënts
Serves 4Afbeeldingjjjj 013
Octopus salad
1 onion
2 carrots
6 tomatoes
4 garlic cloves
1 knob of butter
100 ml of white wine
500 ml of Fish stock
1 kg fresh octopus
freshly ground black pepperAfbeeldingjjjj 002Vinaigrette
2 shallots
75 ml of red wine vinegar
150 ml of extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp English mustardAfbeeldingjjjj 003To plate
purple sprouting broccoli spears
1 kg new potatoes cooked
20 g of capers
4 sprigs of fresh tarragon
1/2 lemon
Sea Salt

Method
1.
To make this octopus recipe, begin by chopping the onion and carrots,
quarter the tomatoes and crush the garlic.
2.
Melt the butter in a large saucepan over a medium heat, stir in the
vegetables and fry gently, without colouring, for about 5 minutes or
until softened.
3.
Pour in the wine. Increase the heat to high and boil until the wine
has reduced to about a teaspoon of liquid, then pour in the fish
stock. Bring to a simmer.Afbeeldingjjjj 011
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4.
Clean the octopus, and remove tentacles from the prepared body (your
fishmonger can do this for you).
5.
Once the pan is simmering, add the octopus. Reduce the heat to low and
simmer for 1 1/2 hours, or until the octopus is tender.
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6.
Strain the contents of the pan through a sieve into a bowl and leave
the collected cooking liquor and octopus to cool.
7.
When the octopus is cool enough to handle, slice across the body into
2 cm-thick strips and set aside.
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8.
To make the vinaigrette, finely chop the shallots and place in a bowl
with the vinegar.
9.
Measure out 75 ml of the reserved cooking liquor, add to the bowl and
leave to stand for 30 minutes.
10.
into the shallot mixture
whisk in the olive oil. Season with salt.
11.
Pour about half the vinaigrette into a small saucepan and warm very
gently over a low heat – do not let it boil. Add the sliced octopus and heat through for 2/3 mins
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12.
Meanwhile, bring a large saucepan of salted water.
13.
Add the purple sprouting broccoli and simmer for a further 2 minutes,
until just tender. Drain and place in a large bowl.
14.
Chop the tarragon and add to the broccoli, cooked potatoes and capers.
15.
Gently stir in the warm vinaigrette and octopus.
16.
Add lemon juice to taste and season with sea salt and black pepper
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17.
Spoon the octopus salad onto serving plates and serve with the
remaining vinaigrette in a jug on the side
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For more info dont hesitate to mail or call
simon.bingham@simons-sauces.com 0031(0)642297107
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Biscotti or Cantuccini

8 Mar

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Biscotti also known as Cantuccini are oblong, thick, brittle cookies designed to be dipped in coffee, cocoa, or dessert wine.
Originating in the Italian city of Prato the term “biscotti” comes from the Latin for “twice baked” because the cookies must be baked twice to make them dry and crunchy. Although these cookies were traditionally almond flavored, modern versions come in a wide variety of flavors. In Italy, these cookies are called “cantucci” or “cantuccini”, while the term “biscotti” is used to refer to many different types of crunchy cookies.

The first biscotti were made as a portable and durable food for Roman soldiers and travelers. They started to be made with the traditional almond flavor during the Renaissance, when it also became popular to dip them in a traditional Italian dessert wine called Vin Santo, a practice that remains common in Italy today. Many people outside of Italy prefer to dip biscotti in coffee or hot chocolate to soften them before eating them. The range of flavors that these cookies come in has also expanded hugely since their creation, and includes ingredients as diverse as walnuts, carob chips, orange zest, and anise. Some types are coated with icing or glazed with chocolate, but the most traditional ones do not have a frosting or coating.

Cranberry & Nut Biscotti
Makes 18-20

20140308-114230.jpg140g plain flour
85g light muscovado sugar
1 large egg
1/2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp ground allspice
55g dried cranberries
55g mixed nuts, toasted
butter or oil for greasing
Zest of 1 orange

Method
1. Preheat the oven to 180C/160C fan/350F/Gas Mark 4, and grease a baking sheet.

2. Whisk the sugar and the egg until it’s pale and thickened a little.

3. Sift the flour, baking powder and allspice into a separate bowl, then fold into the mixture.

4. Add the cranberries, orange zest and pine nuts and mix gently.

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20140308-114909.jpg5. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and shape into a long roll, about 28cm/11in long.

6. Transfer the roll onto the baking sheet, press to flatten slightly, and pop in the oven for 20-25 minutes, until golden.

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20140308-115153.jpg7. Cool for a few minutes, then cut into 1.5cm thick slices, and lay the slices sideways on the baking sheet. Put back in the oven for another 10 minutes, or until golden. Cool on a wire rack.

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20140308-115407.jpgFor more info don’t hesitate to mail or call :
simon.bingham@simons-sauces.com
0031 (0) 642297107

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Beetroot and my Beetroot risotto, Barbabietole risotto

31 Oct

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What is a beetroot?

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Also known as the garden beet, the beetroot is a sweet, maroon coloured root vegetable. It is a healthy, low-calorie food filled with fiber. It is known to help improve health conditions such as high blood pressure. The leaves of the red beet can also be eaten.

Beetroot can be consumed in a variety of ways. If consumed raw, beets should first be peeled. The top and bottom of the root should also be removed prior to ingesting. Beets can also be boiled, sautéed, pickled, fried, juiced, steamed, pureed, grilled, or baked. When cooking beets, the skin may be left on until it is loose enough to fall off, retaining the vegetable’s vivid color.

Soups made from beets, such as cold borsch, are popular in Europe. Pickled beets are a typical way of serving the plant; these are often served on hamburgers in Australia and New Zealand. Juices from the pickled vegetables are often used to prepare other dishes, such as hardboiled eggs, as well. Another common way of serving the vegetable is as a side dish or salad component.

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Canned beets are generally considered to have an inferior taste to fresh beets. Beetroot can be grown at home by planting seeds following the last frost of the spring. The plants require sparse, weekly watering during the majority of the season, with daily moisture provided on hot days.

Caution should be used when preparing beetroot. The colorful pigmentation of the vegetable can stain clothing. If consumed in large quantities, the vegetable can also cause discoloration, typically in a shade of pink, of the urine. This light sensitive vegetable will also turn colors when cut and exposed to light.

Ten beetroot facts

1. The beetroot we eat now is Beta vulgaris, which evolved as a cultivated version of the sea beet, Beta maritima.

2. The ancient Greeks offered beetroot to the god Apollo on silver platters at his temple at Delphi.

3. The 17th century herbalist Nicholas Culpeper said that beetroot juice is good for headaches and afflictions of the brain.

4. Martin Chuzzlewit is the only novel by Charles Dickens that mentions beetroot.

5. The sugar beet has been the official state historic vegetable of Utah since 2002.

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6. The ancient Romans considered beetroot to be an aphrodisiac.

7. The Lupanare, the official brothel of Pompeii, had its walls decorated with pictures of beetroots.

8. One of Alan Sugar’s (the English entrepreneur )first jobs at the age of 11 involved boiling beetroot for a local greengrocer.

9. When American astronauts on Apollo 18 docked with Russians on Soyuz 19 in 1975, the Russians offered them traditional foods including beetroot and cabbage soup.

10. The world’s biggest beetroot was grown in 2005 by Dutchman Piet de Goede weighing 156lb 10oz.

Beetroot risotto, Barbabietole risotto

Ingredients
Serves 4

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1.5 litres good quality vegetable or chicken stock, preferably homemade
1tbsp olive oil
4 shallots or 1 onion, finely chopped
3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
350g (12oz) fresh beetroot, peeled and diced. ( while peeling and chopping wear latex gloves, otherwise you lend up with red fingers )

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250g (8oz) risotto rice
100ml (3½fl oz) white wine
50g (2oz) butter
100g (3½oz) Parmesan cheese
2 bay leaves
2 tbs fresh thyme leaves chopped

Method

1, Heat the stock in a saucepan until almost boiling, then reduce heat until barely simmering to keep it hot.

2, Heat the oil in a shallow heavy-based pan. Sauté the shallot, garlic, bay leaves, beetroot and half of the thyme until softened (about 6-8 minutes).

3, Add the rice and stir well until the grains are well coated and glistening.

4, Pour in the wine, stir and let the rice absorb everything

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5, add one ladleful of hot stock let it simmer, stirring all the time until it has been absorbed.

6, Continue to add the stock at intervals and cook as before until the rice is tender but firm.

7, Add the butter and most of the cheese and stir gently.

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8, Serve scattered with the remaining thyme, the remaining cheese, a good grinding of black pepper and a touch of salt but not too much as the Parmesan gives salt too

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Boun appetito 😊🍴

For more info , questions or queries mail or call:
simon.bingham@simons-sauces.com. 0031 (0) 642297107

And of course I can come and cook it for you🔪🍴

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Squid Ink Risotto / Risotto al Nero di Seppia

28 Oct 20131028-105020.jpg

Black risotto or risotto al nero di seppia made using cuttlefish or squid ink is a dramatic looking dish originating from Venice.
In my recipe I use homemade fish stock, it is worth the time to make your own stock as It gives a fresher more intense flavour, but stock cubes can be used.

Fish Stock

Ingredients
1kg fish bones and skin, preferably bones from white fish , try to avoid oily fish such as salmon or mackerel as it can become bitter.
1 carrot, peeled and roughly chopped
1 onion, peeled and quartered
1 leek, roughly chopped
1 stalk celery, roughly chopped
½ bulb fennel, roughly chopped
6 black peppercorns
2 bay leaves
3 fresh parsley stalks
I glass of white wine
Splash of olive oil

Preparation method

1. Put all the vegetables into a large pan add the oil, peppercorns, bay leaves and parsley, gently heat to soften but not colour.

2. Remove Gil’s from the fish heads and rinse under cold water to remove any blood stains.

3. Once vegetables have softened pour in the wine and turn the heat up to cook off the alcohol.

4. Add fish bones and 2 litres of water bring to the boil and skim off any scum that has formed.

5. Reduce the heat cover and simmer very gently for 20-30 minutes. Strain into a large bowl and allow to cool or use directly in your risotto
Any leftover stock can be frozen and kept for 3 months.

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Squid Ink Risotto / Risotto al Nero di Seppia

Ingredients

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1.5 litre fish stock
50g/2oz butter
1 onion or banana shallots finely chopped

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½ tsp dried red chilli flakes
250g/9oz arborio rice ( risotto rice)
125ml/4½fl oz dry white wine
2 sachets squid ink (available from some fishmongers)
500g squid
salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 lemon, zest only
2 tbsp flatleaf parsley
½ tsp dried red chilli flakes
extra virgin olive oil

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Preparation method

1. For the risotto, place the chicken stock into a pan and bring to a gentle simmer.

2. Meanwhile, heat another pan until hot and add a splash of olive oil and the butter. Once the butter has melted, add the onion, half of the garlic and chilli flakes. Cook for a few minutes until softened, but not coloured.

3. Add the rice to the pan and stir with a wooden spoon until the rice is translucent and coated with the oil.

4. Add the wine and cook until the liquid has reduced by half.

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5. Add the squid ink and stir thoroughly with a wooden spoon to disperse the ink throughout the rice.

6. Pour in the hot stock, a ladle at a time, and keep stirring until each ladleful is absorbed. Keep adding the stock, stirring as often as possible until the rice is tender, but still with a slight resistance to the bite – this should take about 20-30 minutes.

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7. Meanwhile, clean the squid. Pull the tentacles away from the squid’s body. Remove the quill from inside the body and discard. Clean the body by running it under a tap or cleaning it in a bowl of water. Remove the ‘ears’ from either side of the squid body and remove the skin with your fingers. Cut the tentacles just below the eyes, being sure not to cut the ink sac. Be sure to remove the ‘beak’ at the base of the tentacles. Cut the body of the squid into rings.

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8. preheat a pan until hot

9. Add splash of olive oil , the rest of the garlic and the squid. Cook on a high heat for 1-2 minutes or until coloured on all sides and just cooked through.

10. Remove the squid from the heat and place into a bowl. Add the lemon zest, parsley, chilli flakes . Mix together and season with a little salt and freshly ground black pepper.

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11. To serve, spoon the risotto into the centre of each of individual plate and top with a pile of marinated squid and a drizzle of olive oil

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For more info don’t hesitate to mail or call
: simon.bingham@simons-sauces.com 0031 (0)642297107

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Slow-cooked lamb shoulder with boulangere potatoes

3 Oct

Slow-cooked lamb shoulder with boulangere potatoes

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Last weekend i had some guests over for dinner, it was a busy day, most of it spent away from home! So what to cook for them? Well I need something with not too much hassle that can impress!
Well I saw a great very simple recipe that was on a new cooking show from the BBC “Tom Kerridge’s Proper Pub Food.” Slow-cooked lamb shoulder with boulangere potatoes, which was just perfect because I didn’t have much time to prepare anything, and wasn’t really in the mood to cook.
Omg I have to report this was delicious, the lamb just fell from the bone and melted in the mouth, the first layer of potatoes crispy and underneath unctuous and full of flavour from the thyme and onions.

Ingredients
Less than 30 mins preparation time
5 hours cooking time
Serves 6

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3 medium onions, thinly sliced
6 large waxy potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced using a mandolin
1 bunch thyme, leaves picked
salt and black pepper
1 whole lamb shoulder
1 garlic bulb, peeled and separated into cloves
600ml good quality lamb or chicken stock
75ml olive oil
50g butter in blocks
cooked French beans (or other green vegetables), to serve

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<img src="http://simonssauces.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/20131003-202827.jpg" alt="20131003-202827.jpg" class="

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Preparation method

Preheat the oven to 130C/275F/Gas 1.
1. In a roasting tin or dish layer the potatoes then the onions and thyme. Season with salt and pepper, repeat until everything is used up, the top layer should be potato, now scatter with the butter

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2, Cut small incisions all over the lamb using a small knife and stick the whole garlic cloves in the holes, pushing them deep into the meat to prevent them burning while the meat cooks.
3, season with salt and pepper and rub the olive oil all over he meat, now place on top of the potatoes

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4, Pour the chicken stock over and place in the oven for 4-5 hours, or until the potatoes are crisp on top and soft inside.

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Maybe it’s time to open some wine!!! I’ve got some St Emelion from 2011 🍷👍😉cheers

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5, When cooked, remove the lamb from the oven, cover with aluminium foil and set aside to rest for 20 minutes. If the potatoes rant quite crispy enough you can place back into the oven under the grill to crisp up whilst resting the meat, keep a close eye not to burn them.
Serve with French beans (or any vegetable of your choice).
Bon appetite😋

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For more info , or if you wish I could cook it for you mail or call:
simon.bingham@simons-sauces.com 0031 (0)642297107,

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    Crab. And my spicy crab spaghetti

    30 Sep

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    There are around 4,500 different kinds of crab around the world, but brown crab is the most commonly available around the coasts of northern Europe and can weigh up to 3kg.
    Crab is cheaper and just as tasty as lobster, it’s also full of protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which help build muscle, protect against heart disease and support the immune system

    BROWN CRABS, have a delectable sweet flesh, and are prized by food lovers. Scottish ones, perhaps the most sought after, score top marks for their flavour, which owes much to them feeding in cold, unpolluted waters.

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    BLUE CRAB – although recently introduced to the Mediterranean, it is actually native to the Eastern side of North America, especially around the coast of Maryland.

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    SOFT-SHELL CRAB is blue crab in its moulted state – a much sought after delicacy. Blue crab sheds and re-grows its shell in just over 24-hours.

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    SPIDER CRAB – a northern European species, particularly popular in France.

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    SNOW CRAB – inhabits the deep cold waters of the Atlantic Ocean. It’s usually canned and processed rather than sold fresh.

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    White Meat
    White crab meat comes from the claws and legs of the crab and while predominantly white in colour it does have a naturally occurring red/brown tinge throughout. White crab is very low in fat and particularly high in protein, it has a delicate, sweet flavour, a sweet aroma and a naturally flaky texture. White crab meat is versatile and while it is consumed largely in sandwiches, it can be used in pastas, risottos, and salads as well as a canape topping.

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    Brown Meat
    Brown Meat is from the body of the crab. It has a higher natural fat content, but is also extremely high in Omega-3. 100g of Brown Crab contains 2/3 of the 3g weekly recommended intake of Omega 3. Brown crab meat has an even pate like texture and a rich full flavour. The colour and texture of the brown meat vary throughout the year as the crabs physiology changes.

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    Cooking fresh crab .
    Ingredients .
    1 bulb of fennel chopped
    1 tsp pepper corns
    2 bay leaves
    Salt, enough so the water tastes like the ocean

    1,Pour 5 litres of water into a large saucepan and add around 5 tablespoons of sea salt, the fennel, bay leaves and peppercorns, bring to the boil

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    Grasp the live crab by the back legs and drop it into the water headfirst. For a more humane method, as you grasp the crab by the legs, stroke the top of its head until it falls asleep and then slowly drop it into the boiling water.
    Bring the water back to the boil and only then start timing.
    You should cook large crabs (about 1kg) for around 15 – 20 minutes, whilst smaller crabs will only need around 8 – 10 minutes.
    Once the water has started to boil again, reduce the heat and simmer for the required time. The crab’s shell should turn a bright orange when done.
    When the crabs are done, immerse them for a few seconds in cold water so that cooking stops and they do not overcook.

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    Picking for the crabmeat or undressing the crab .

    Place the crab on its back onto a large chopping board and snap off the tail flap, legs and claws. With a fresh crab this should be very easy.

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    Pull the head shell away from the body of the crab
    On the body part you will see the ‘dead man’s fingers’ a dozen or so (off-white spongy gills) which must be removed and thrown away.
    With a crab pick or a teaspoon handle ( a crochet needle is also a fantastic tool for this ) pick out all the white meat from all the nooks and crannies from within the crabs body trying not to break off any bone as you go , this is time consuming but you’ll be rewarded with the sweetest tasting meat

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    Inside the shell remove the stomach sac, hard membranes, mouth parts and throwaway.
    Using a teaspoon scoop out the brown meat, place in a small bowl and mash gently with a fork. This is fantastic in sauces and has such a rich flavour.

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    My spicy crab and squid ink spaghetti

    If you have the crab ready to use this only takes 15 mins start to finish!
    Ingredients
    Serves 4

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    Olive oil
    2 cloves garlic
    1 red chilli (de seed for less heat) chopped, chilli and crab a match made in heaven!!!
    700g of your undressed crab, white and brown meat kept separate
    100ml white wine
    zest and juice of lemon
    500g squid ink spaghetti ( regular spaghetti can also be used if you can’t find the squid ink variety)
    handful parsley copped
    handful basil chopped
    Salt and pepper to season

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    Method

    1.Put a large pan of water on to boil for the pasta.
    2.Pass the brown crabmeat through a sieve so it’s nice and creamy

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    3.In a large pestle and mortar pulverise the peeled garlic cloves with the salt, so that it makes a smooth paste. Then add the chopped and seeded chilli and crush again.

    3.Tip in the crab brown. Zest the lemon into the mortar and then add the juice. Using a fork, beat well to mix, you are ready to cook your pasta, cook according to packet instructions.

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    4. 5 mins before the pasta is ready heat some oil in a pan or wok on a medium temperature, add the sauce once it starts to cook simmer add the wine and simmer for a further 2 mins (don’t let it boil)

    5.Drain the pasta and tip into the wok or pan with the sauce, Immediately add white crab meat, chopped parsley, torn basil and toss to mix all together, season to taste and toss again .

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    6.serve direct in hot dishes , or if you want that 70s retro look serve in the shells ( thoroughly cleaned out of course) a cold glass of Pinot Grigio will go perfect to wash everything down!😉

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    For more info don’t hesitate to mail or call
    : simon.bingham@simons-sauces.com 0031 (0)642297107

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    Curry night with a Saag aloo & Rogan Josh

    23 Sep

    Autumn had officially arrived and the cold nights have started! So how about something spicy to warm you up.
    Today I have two recipes, yes two delicious recipes!
    Saag Aloo & Rogan Josh

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    Saag – meaning spinach, and Aloo – meaning potato, this classic north Indian side dish can be a great way to get the goodness of spinach into people (which lets face it, isn’t always easy). Not only does it contain healthy spinach, but this mildly spiced dish is truly delicious and tastes great alongside your favourite curry.

    Rogan Josh is a ‘real curry’. Hearty, rich and flavoursome, with a medium spiciness, it is one of my most favourite indian curries. The dish originated from the Kashmir region of India, and like many Indian dishes there are many different variations. Our version uses a special blend of cardamom, garam masala and coriander with other spices and of course fresh tomatoes blended into a puree, to create a deliciously tasty, rich and aromatic dish.

    Ingredients
    Serves 4/6

    Saag aloo
    A great dish for vegetarians

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    • 4 large potatoes, cut into 2 cm pieces
    • 1 onion, sliced
    • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
    • ½ tsp each: cumin, crushed coriander seeds, turmeric, chili powder and fenugreek

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    • 2 green chilies, sliced
    • 4 inch fresh ginger, grated
    • 2 cloves garlic, grated
    • 600g of spinach
    • Juice of ½ lemon
    • naan bread

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    Perpetration method.

    1, Cook the potato until just tender.
    2,Fry the sliced onions gently in the oil, add the spices and chilli and cook for 2-3 minutes.
    3, Stir in the ginger and garlic.

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  • 4, Drain the potatoes and let them steam dry for 1 minute.
    5, Add to the onion mixture and stir fry all golden brown. Add any extra oil.
    6, Mix half the spinach. Allow to shrink and add the rest. Let everything simmer for 8-10 minutes.
    7, Add the lemon juice and serve

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    Rogan josh

    Ingredients
    Serves 4/6
    • 5 tbsp vegetable oil
    • 7 black peppercorns, left whole
    • 3 black cardamom pods, left whole
    • 5 green cardamom pods, left whole
    • 4 cloves, left whole
    • 1 cinnamon stick
    • 1 piece of mace
    • 1 onion, finely chopped
    • 750g neck of lamb or mutton, bone intact, cut into pieces
    • 6 garlic cloves, peeled, left whole
    • 2cm/¾in piece ginger, peeled and cut in half
    • 2 tsp ground coriander
    • 2 tsp ground cumin
    • ½ tsp red chilli powder
    • 2 tsp ground fennel seeds
    • 1½ tsp garam masala
    • salt, to taste
    • 2 tomatoes, blended to a pulp in a food processor
    • 3 tbsp plain yoghurt, stirred
    • handful chopped fresh coriander, leaves and stalks

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    Preparation method
    1. Heat the oil in a large pan over a medium heat. Add the black peppercorns, black and green cardamom pods, cloves, cinnamon and mace and fry for 1-2 minutes, or until the spices are sizzling and fragrant.
    2. Add the chopped onion and fry for 8-10 minutes, stirring regularly, until golden-brown.
    3. Add the lamb pieces and fry for 3-4 minutes, stirring continually, until golden-brown all over.
    4. Meanwhile, in a food processor, blend the garlic cloves and ginger with one tablespoon of water to a fine paste.
    5. Add the garlic and ginger paste to the lamb mixture, stir well to combine, then reduce the heat and continue to cook for 3-4 minutes, stirring regularly.
    6. Stir in the powdered coriander, cumin, red chilli powder, fennel seeds, garam masala, salt, tomato pulp and yoghurt, cover the pan with a lid, then reduce the heat to a low heat and simmer for 10-12 minutes, or until the sauce has almost completely dried out.

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    7. Add 2-3 tablespoons of boiling water to the sauce, stir well and simmer for a further 7-8 minutes, stirring continually and adding splashes of water as necessary, until the volume of liquid has reduced and the sauce has thickened.
    8. Add enough boiling water to almost cover the lamb, bring the mixture to the boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer and simmer or 8-10 minutes, or until the lamb is cooked through.
    9. Stir in the chopped coriander just before serving.

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    10. Im serving this with basmati rice cooked in coconut milk ,Saag Aloo, naan bread and mango chutney

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    Still don’t fancy making it yourself ! I could come and cook it for you
    For more info don’t hesitate to mail or call :
    simon.bingham@simons-sauces.com 0031 (0)642297107

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