Archive | poultry RSS feed for this section

Pigeon and beetroot warm salad

25 Oct

Pigeon and beetroot warm saladimage
A warm salad of wood pigeon with toasted hazelnuts, walnuts, and fresh beetroot , can be used as a starter or as a delicious main course

Ingredients
Serves 2

* 1 tbsp olive oil
* 1 garlic clove finely sliced
* 1 rosemary sprig
* 2 pigeon crowns seasoned with salt and pepperimage 100g bag watercress
* 1 eating apple, quartered and sliced
* 4 cooked beetroots sliced and diced
* 100g toasted hazelnuts and walnuts roughly chopped

Method* Make the dressing by whisking the balsamic and olive oil together.

* Heat the oil in a frying pan. Add the garlic and rosemary, turn the oven up to 240°

* Brown the crowns in the hot pan with the olive oil, rosemary and garlic then place in the oven for six minutes. Allow to rest, then carve off the breastsimageimage
* Divide the watercress between 4 plates, arrange the apple and beetroot over, then the sliced pigeon breasts. Scatter with hazelnuts, drizzle with the dressing and serve straight awayimage
For more info contact me; simon.bingham@simons-sauces.com 0031(0)642297107image

Pot Roasted chicken with 40 cloves of garlic, colcannon and a creamy tarragon sauce

6 Oct

Pot Roasted chicken with 40 cloves of garlic, colcannon and a creamy tarragon sauce imageDon’t be scared at the amount of garlic in this deliciously tasty dish, real comfort food, my take on a typical roast chicken.

Ingredients
For the chicken

* 250g shallots 

* 1.5kg whole fresh chicken preferably free range 

* ½ lemon, halved 

* 1 large bay leaf

* 1 tbsp finely chopped fresh thyme

* 25g butter

* 1 tbsp sunflower oil

* 40 garlic cloves unpeeled 

* 150ml/vermouth

* 250ml chicken stock preferably homemade 

* 2 tbsp chopped fresh tarragon leaves

* 100ml double cream or crème fraîche

* flaked sea salt and freshly ground black pepper



For the colcannon

* 1kg floury potatoes, preferably Maris Piper or King Edward

* 75g butter

* 100g rindless smoked streaky bacon rashers, cut into 2cm/¾in pieces

* 300g fresh kale

* 6 spring onions, trimmed and finely sliced

* 200ml double cream

* flaked sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preparation method
* Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas 6. Place the shallots in a heat-proof bowl, cover with just-boiled water and leave to stand for five minutes. This will make the skins easier to remove.


* Remove any string from the chicken and place the lemon and bay leaf inside the cavity. Generously season the chicken inside and out with plenty of flaked sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Sprinkle with the chopped thyme over all sides. 


* Melt the butter with the oil in a large flameproof casserole. Brown the chicken over a medium-high heat for a couple of minutes on each side. 


* Drain the shallots and, once cool enough to handle, peel off the skin and trim, halving any larger ones. Add the whole garlic cloves and shallots to the casserole, nestling around the chicken.


* Pour over the vermouth and chicken stock. Cover the casserole with a tight-fitting lid and bring the liquid to a simmer on the hob, then transfer to the oven for 1¼ hours, or until the chicken is thoroughly cooked and the garlic is completely softened.
image

* Transfer the chicken, garlic and shallots to a warmed platter and cover with a piece of foil and a couple of dry tea towels. Holding the casserole with an oven-cloth, tilt the chicken liquor to one side. Skim off any fat that rises to the surface and discard.

* Return the casserole to the hob and stir in the tarragon and cream (or crème fraîche). Bring to a gentle simmer, stirring. Cook for three minutes. Season to taste and pour into a warmed jug. 


* For the colcannon, peel the potatoes and cut into evenly-sized chunks. Put in a large saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to the boil and cook for about 15 minutes, or until very tender. Test with the tip of a knife. Instead of boiling you could use baked potatoes , once baked just scoop out of the skins and mash.


* While the potatoes are cooking, trim the thick stems and cut out much of the tough central vein from each kale leaf. Thinly shred the leaves and wash in a colander under cold running water. Drain.


* Heat 25g/1oz of the butter in a large non-stick frying pan and fry the bacon and kale for four minutes, stirring regularly until the kale is tender. If it is still a little tough after four minutes, add a couple of tablespoons of cold water and continue cooking for a couple of minutes more. Add the spring onions and cook for one minute, stirring. 
image

* Drain the potatoes in a large colander and return to the saucepan. Leave to stand for a couple of minutes. Warm the cream and remaining butter in small pan. Mash the cooked potatoes with the cream and milk until smooth and season to taste. Use a set of electric beaters if you want your mash to be really fluffy and light.


* Tip the softened kale into the same pan and stir together until lightly combined. Transfer to a warmed dish.image
* Carve the chicken into chunky pieces and serve with the sauce and colcannon. image
For more info contact; simon.bingham@simons-sauces.com 0031(0)642297107image

Pollo alla Cacciatora servito con erbe e parmigiano polenta, hunters chicken served with a herb and parmesan polenta

18 Jan

Pollo alla Cacciatora servito con erbe e parmigiano polenta, hunters chicken served with a herb and parmesan polenta
image
Pollo alla Cacciatori (Hunter’s Chicken) is found across Northern Italy, with many variations. My version uses meaty bone-in chicken thighs, drumsticks and is full of onions, olives, garlic and tomatoes.
Ingredients
Serves 4

4 x free range chicken thighs and 4 x drumsticks skin on
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
8 bay leaves
2 sprigs fresh rosemary
1 large onion
6 cloves garlic, peeled (3crushed, 3sliced)
500 ml red wine
flour, for dustingimage
extra virgin olive oil
6 anchovy fillets
1 tbsp capers
I handful of chopped flat leaf parsley
1 handful green or black olives, stoned
1 x 400 g good-quality tinned plum tomatoes.

Method

1. Season the chicken pieces with salt and freshly ground black pepper and put them into a bowl. Add the bay leaves and rosemary sprigs and the crushed cloves of garlic and cover with the wine. Leave to marinate for at least an hour, but preferably overnight in the fridge.

2. Preheat your oven to 180ºC/350ºF/gas 4. Drain the chicken, reserving the marinade, and pat dry with kitchen paper.
3. Dust the chicken pieces with flour and shake off any excess. Heat an ovenproof pan, add a splash of olive oil, fry the chicken pieces until browned lightly all over and put to one side.

4. Place the pan back on the heat and add the sliced garlic and onions. Fry gently until golden brown, then add the anchovies, olives, capers, tomatoes (broken up with a wooden spoon) and the chicken pieces with their reserved marinade. Bring to the boil, cover with a lid and bake in the preheated oven for 1½ hours.

When cooked taste and add the chopped parsley and little salt and pepper if necessary, and serve with a salad, pasta, some cannellini beans or as I do with creamy herb and parmesan polenta , garnish with chopped parsley

Polenta image
An Italian storecupboard staple, polenta has its roots in the peasant cuisine of northern Italy. Where once it was just a humble peasant food, polenta has emerged as a versatile, fine-dining-style. It’s made by grinding corn into flour, or meal. It has a rich yellow, yolk-like colour, and has a slightly sweet flavourPolenta can be cooked to be creamy and thick, or allowed to set and then sliced. Serve it instead of pasta, rice or potatoes. Use in place of breadcrumbs to coat chicken or fish when frying.

Ingredients

Serves 4
150ml milk
½ tsp salt
150g coarse cornmeal
50g butter
25g grated parmesan (optional)
1tsp chopped flat leaf parsleyimage

1. Put the milk in a large, heavy-based pan along with 600ml water and the salt, and bring to the boil. Meanwhile, measure out the cornmeal and put it near the hob.

2. When the pan comes to the boil, add the cornmeal, letting it run in thin streams through your fingers, whisking continuously. Stir for a minute or two until it thickens.

3. Turn the heat right down and stir well, roughly every 4-5 minutes to prevent it sticking, for about 35-45 minutes, until the polenta begins to come away from the sides of the pan. Stir in the butter, parsley and cheese, if using, then put on a hot serving dish.
image
For more info don’t hesitate to mail or call
: simon.bingham@simons-sauces.com 0031 (0)642297107
image

Asparagus and my Roasted Crispy Chicken with Braised Spring Vegetables Recipe

20 May

Asparagus.

Spring, From asparagus and artichokes to peas and broad beans, spring brings a fresh crop of sweet, versatile vegetables that brighten any meal.

Asparagus

20130520-184202.jpg
The short-lived season, spanning just six to eight weeks, makes it the most eagerly awaited springtime food.
The arrival of asparagus heralds the beginning of summer’s succulent salads, and the end of the wintry brassica’s reign. Long considered a delicacy, in the past asparagus has been prized as highly as oysters or truffles.

20130520-184308.jpg
Here are ten facts about this sweet-stemmed springtime vegetable:
1. Asparagus is a member of the lily family.
2. Asparagus first came to Britain with the Romans. It thrives as a wild plant, and with its high tolerance of sandy, salty soil it will grow along riverbanks, shores of lakes, and coastlines, leading to much argument as to where it actually originated.
3. Asparagus also comes in shades of purple and red, which turn green only when cooked.
4. Sizes range from slender, young ‘sprue’ asparagus to thicker-stemmed, jumbo-sized ‘kitchen’ grades.
5. It takes about three years for asparagus plants to become established, and even longer to reach a fully productive state.
6. In the UK, asparagus is traditionally grown in the Vale of Evesham in Worcestershire, and East Anglia.
7. Asparagus is considered a difficult food to pair with wine – it contains methyl mercaptan, a sulphur compound, which tends to give wine a vegetal or metallic taste. Try pairing asparagus with cool-climate wines that have pronounced herbal flavours to counteract this.
8. Top accompaniments for asparagus are butter, parmesan, hollandaise and vinaigrette, eggs, bacon or pancetta.
9. White asparagus is grown by creating mounds of soil around the growing spears, hiding them from the light and resulting in their blanched, pale look. It is particularly labour-intensive to harvest, as experienced eyes are needed to spot the spear tips in the soil.
10. In Thailand and Vietnam asparagus is known as măng tây, which means ‘European bamboo shoots’.
Prepping asparagus .
Because asparagus is grown in sandy soil, rinse the spears — especially the tips — with cold water. Snap off the woody base of each spear by bending the spear a few times to find a place where it breaks easily. This is usually around the bottom third of the spear and where the woody part starts to turn tender. If desired, scrape off the scales on the spears with a vegetable peeler. This gives the spears a smooth, clean look and is especially beneficial for tough or fat spears.

Roasted Crispy Chicken with Braised Spring Vegetables

Ingredients : serves 4

For the chicken:
4 Pieces of Skin-on Bone-in Chicken Thighs
2 Tbsp of Olive Oil
2 Large Shallots, peeled and halved
4 garlic cloves peel on no need to remove : smashed
4 sprigs rosemary
8 sprigs thyme
Salt & Pepper to season

For the spring vegetables:
1 knob of butter
olive oil
150 ml white wine
150 ml organic chicken or vegetable stock
I clove garlic pealed and smashed
2 large shallots diced
500g asparagus
400 g fresh peas and broad beans removed from shells (frozen can be used too)
2 little gem lettuces, sliced
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
good-quality extra virgin olive oil

Method

1: Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas 6.
2: in an oven proof dish make a bed out of the rosemary,thyme, halved shallot and garlic , pat dry the chicken pieces , season and place on top of its herby bed and dress with olive oil, cook in oven for aprox 20/25 mins until skin is crispy and cooked through.

20130520-184701.jpg
3: prepare your peas, broad beans and asparagus (tip for asparagus see above ) for blanching

20130520-184831.jpg
4: Bring a pot of water to a boil. Add enough salt so it tastes as salty as the ocean.
5: Prepare a large bowl of ice water
6: Put veggies in the boiling water for max 2 mins !!! Not any longer
7: Drain vegetables and transfer them to the ice water. Swish them around in the water until cool. Drain and pat dry .( blanching like this intensifies the the colour and flavour)

20130520-184939.jpg

<img src="https://simonssauces.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/20130520-184954.jpg" alt="20130520-
8: Slowly heat the butter and a good lug of olive oil in a pan add the diced shallot and garlic , cook until translucent NOT COLOURED !
9: slowly pour in the wine & stock. Turn up the heat and add the blanched vegetables with a pinch of salt and pepper. simmer for 5 minutes or until tender

20130520-185559.jpg
10: now add the little gem lettuce just to wilt ,Taste, correct the seasoning . Ready to serve

20130520-185649.jpg
11: to serve . Divide the braised vegetables on to hot dishes with all its juices then carefully place the roasted chicken thighs on top , dress with good extra virgin olive oil 😋

20130520-185818.jpg

20130520-185830.jpg
This dish can be made for a quick midweek meal or for a wonderfully delicious dinner party , still flummoxed or nervous and want to try this I can come and cook it for you ! 😃🔪🍴

For more info don’t hesitate to mail or call :
simon.bingham@simons-sauces.com
0031(0) 642297107

Coq au Vin

27 Apr

Coq au Vin

Coq au Vin (Chicken in Red Wine, ) comes from the Burgundy region of France. It’s a classic, country-style casserole cooked with full-bodied Burgundy wine. Often used as a comfort food during cold months.
My Coq au vin recipe is easy to follow starting with making a basic stock (not sock with thanks to jay lol), if you don’t fancy jointing a whole chicken just buy chicken thighs and legs and use a good shop bought stock or those pesky cubes .

Ingredients

20130427-153241.jpg

Serves 4.
a large chicken, jointed into 6 or 8 pieces, giblets and carcass saved I prefer to use cornfed free range
an onion, a carrot and a few peppercorns for the stock
150g pancetta or unsmoked bacon in the piece
30g butter
2 medium onions
a large carrot
2 ribs of celery
2 cloves of garlic
… 2 tbsps flour
2 tbsps cognac
a bottle of red wine
4 or 5 small sprigs of thyme
3 bay leaves
40g butter
12 small onions, peeled
200g small mushrooms

Method
1:Put the chicken carcass any bits and bobs of bone and flesh into a deep pan, cover with water, add an onion and a carrot, half a dozen whole peppercorns and bring to the boil. Turn the heat down and let it simmer until you need it.

2:Cut the pancetta into short strips; they need to be thicker than a match but not quite as thick as your little finger. Put them, together with the butter, into a thick-bottomed casserole – one of enamelled cast iron would be perfect – and let them cook over a moderate heat. Stir the pancetta from time to time – it mustn’t burn – then, when it is golden, lift it out into a bowl, leaving behind the fat in the pan.

20130427-153755.jpg

20130427-153958.jpg

3:Season the chicken pieces with salt and pepper and place them in the hot fat in the casserole, so that they fit snugly yet have room to colour. Turn them when the underside is pale gold. The skin should be honey coloured rather than brown – it is this colouring of the skin, rather than what wine or herbs you might add later, that is crucial to the flavour of the dish. Lift the chicken out and into the bowl with the pancetta. By now you should have a thin film of goo starting to stick to the pan. This is where much of your flavour will come from.

20130427-154521.jpg

20130427-154559.jpg

20130427-154617.jpg

20130427-154634.jpg

4:While the chicken is colouring in the pan, peel and roughly chop the onions and carrot, and wash and chop the celery. With the chicken out, add the onions to the pan and cook slowly, stirring from time to time, until the onion is translucent and it has gone some way to dissolving some of the pan goo. Add the, peeled and thinly sliced garlic.

20130427-154947.jpg

20130427-154958.jpg

20130427-155010.jpg

20130427-155024.jpg

20130427-155102.jpg

20130427-155114.jpg

5:Return the chicken and pancetta to the pan, stir in the flour and let everything cook for a minute or two before pouring in the cognac, wine carrots, celery and tucking in the herbs. Spoon in ladles of the simmering chicken stock until the entire chicken is covered. Bring to the boil, then, just as it gets there, turn the heat down so that the sauce bubbles gently. Cover partially with a lid.

20130427-155331.jpg

20130427-155354.jpg

20130427-155411.jpg

20130427-155452.jpg

20130427-155511.jpg

20130427-155523.jpg

20130427-155535.jpg

20130427-155550.jpg

20130427-155606.jpg

20130427-155616.jpg

6:Melt the butter in a small pan, add the small peeled onions and then the mushrooms, halving or quartering them if they are too big. Let them cook until they are golden, then add them to the chicken with a seasoning of salt and pepper

20130427-155836.jpg

20130427-155935.jpg

7:Check the chicken after 40 minutes to see how tender it is. It should be soft but not falling from its bones. It will probably take about an hour, depending on the type of chicken you are using. Lift the chicken out and into a bowl.
Turn the heat up under the sauce and let it bubble enthusiastically until it has reduced a little. As it bubbles down it will become thicker – though not thick – and will become quite glossy.
Return the chicken to the pan and serve with rice or potatoes

20130427-160126.jpg

20130427-160136.jpg

20130427-160148.jpg

20130427-160201.jpg

Ok my presentation needs work but it tastes fantastic .
For more info or I can come an cook it for you don’t hesitate to mail or call
simon.bingham@simons-sauces.com. 0642297107

%d bloggers like this: