Tag Archives: cod

Wild garlic and My Butter poached Cod with wild garlic miso and grilled asparagus recipe

1 Apr
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Wild garlic

Spring is in the air and wild garlic is a truly idyllic culinary treat – a wild ingredient that, when in season, grows in abundance, nestled among bluebells, attracted by the moist soil and shady woodland environment. Wild garlic has enjoyed a culinary boom in recent times, taking its place alongside rhubarb and asparagus as a pillar of spring’s bounty. It has a short season, usually first appearing in mid-March and lasting until early May.

Wild garlic can be identified by its distinctive smell, long pointed leaves and white flowers, which bloom at the end of the season. Don’t pick wild garlic that has large amounts of white flowers, as this indicates older leaves which are likely to be slightly woody and bitter in flavour.

Although the pungent smell of garlic makes it easy to identify, always take care when foraging your own ingredients – there have been cases of people mistaking poisonous plants (such as Lily of the Valley) for wild garlic. That said, it is certainly one of the easiest things to forage for, as wild garlic smells particularly strong.

Wild garlic doesn’t have to be foraged. It’s a frequent staple of food markets at the peak of the season. As with all vegetables, choose wild garlic with bright, fresh leaves and avoid specimens that have wilted.

A member of the Allium the plant has the same pleasing combination of sweetness and astringency that make leeks, onions, spring onions, chives and bulb garlic so useful in the kitchen.Although edible, the bulbs of the wild garlic plant are usually too small to be of much use and if you ever buy a bunch you’re unlikely to see any bulb at all (digging the bulbs out means no foliage for next year). The characteristic white flowers however, are perfectly edible – and pretty too – although the plant is at its best before too many flowers appear, signalling tougher leaves and a more bitter flavour. In April, when wild garlic is at its peak, you are more likely to find delicious tight buds than open flowers, but clever cooks call upon many different preserving techniques such as pickling, fermenting and freezing in a flavoured butter

Served with jersey royals and asparagus alongside roast chicken or spring lamb they’re a seasonal dream.Eggs are also a natural bedfellow – in an omelette or frittata or woven into a plate of buttery scrambled eggs. Soothing spring risottos tame the wild leaf and it makes an excellent pesto. And in a soup adding a delicate flavour.

Wild garlic flowers will give any dish a touch of cheffy presentation and their delicate floral garlic flavour is not to be missed. If you manage to catch the flowers in their buds just before they have bloomed, try pickling them. This is also a good way of reducing the amount of seeding the plant will do if your wild garlic patch is getting out of control!

Once the flowers are starting to go, you will be left with the three-cornered nobbly little seed pods. These can be picked, salted and pickled to create zingy little garlic capers. A lovely way to preserve wild garlic long after the season ends

Butter poached Cod with wild garlic miso and grilled asparagus

Ingredients

serves 4

COD

• 500g of cod fillet, skinned

• 100g of rock salt

• 200g of unsalted butter, cubed

lemon juice, to taste

WILD GARLIC MISO

• 60g of miso paste, brown rice miso if available

• 30g of wild garlic, leaves picked and washed, reserve the flowers for garnish

• 20ml of water

• 160ml of grapeseed oil

lemon juice, to taste

salt, to taste

ASPARAGUS

• 18 asparagus spears

salt, to taste

lemon juice, to taste

TO SERVE

• 50g of bonito flakes , grated

Method

1 Place the cod fillet in a dish or baking tray and sprinkle over the rock salt to cover. Leave to salt for 7 minutes

2Meanwhile, place the miso, wild garlic leaves and water in a blender and blitz together until smooth. Gradually add the oil while continuing to blend and allow the mixture to emulsify (as if making a mayonnaise). When fully combined, season to taste with a little lemon juice and salt

3 After 7 minutes rinse the salt from the cod under cold water and pat the fish dry with kitchen paper. Cut into 4 equal portions and set aside

4 Preheat to high a griddle pan.

5 To cook the cod, place the butter in a pan and cook over a high heat to create a brown butter (beurre noisette). As soon as the butter starts to foam and is lightly golden with a nutty aroma, remove from the heat and cool quickly to stop it from burning

6 Pour the butter into a wide pan (large enough to fit all 4 pieces of cod) and warm through gently to 60°C. Add the cod and gently poach for 5 minutes on each side, being careful to keep the temperature low

7 While poaching, griddle the asparagus spears for 2 minutes until tender, turning regularly. Thinly slice the cooked spears into 2mm thick rounds and season with a little lemon juice, salt and some of the butter from cooking the cod

8 To serve, spoon a generous amount of the wild garlic miso into each serving dish. Drain the cod from the butter and pull apart into large flakes. Dress these with a little more salt, lemon juice and butter and add to the dishes

9 Scatter over the asparagus slices and garnish with the reserved wild garlic flowers and a pinch of bonito flakes.

Pan-roasted cod loin with pea and asparagus risotto

12 Jul

Risotto is a traditional Italian rice dish made from a short-grained, starchy variety of rice called arborio rice. The technique for making it is called the risotto method, which involves stirring small amounts of hot stock or broth into the rice a little at a time, allowing the liquid to be absorbed as you go.

While the rice cooks, it releases its starch, which is essential to giving the risotto a rich, creamy consistency. The more starch in your rice, the creamier the risotto. This is why cooking your rice slowly is essential; cooking risotto low and slow gives super-starchy arborio rice the time it needs to release the starch and achieve the sought-after creaminess.

Like pasta, risotto is cooked al dente, which means that it should be slightly firm to the bite—a degree of doneness that might seem underdone in ordinary white rice. It should not be crunchy though.

Ingredients

• COD LOIN

• 4 portions of cod loin, thick, skin-on

• 2 tbsp of olive oil

• 30g of unsalted butter

salt

freshly ground black pepper

• PEA AND ASPARAGUS RISOTTO

• 150g of asparagus spears, fine

• 1l vegetable or chicken stock, fresh

• 2 shallots, peeled and finely chopped

• 1 small fennel bulb finely chopped

• Zest and juice of 1 lemon

• 1 Handful of chopped mint

• 1 handful of chopped oregano and dill

• 1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed

• 25g of unsalted butter, diced

• 250g of carnaroli risotto rice

• 250ml of dry white wine

• 50g fresh or frozen peas

• 30g of Parmesan, finely grated

• 1 tbsp of olive oil

salt

freshly ground black pepper

• Sprigs of dill for serving

Method

1

To begin, place the vegetable stock in a small pan, bring to the boil then keep warm over a low heat

2

Prepare the asparagus by snapping of the woody ends (add the woody ends to the pan with vegetable stock). Cut an inch off the tips of the spears and finely slice the remaining middle section into discs, setting both aside

3

Make the risotto by adding the olive oil to a wide, heavy-based frying pan over a low heat. Sweat the shallot, fennel and crushed garlic until soft and translucent, this will take around 8–10 minutes. Season lightly with salt and pepper

4

Add the diced butter to the pan along with the rice and stir for a couple of minutes until the rice becomes hot and sticky. Turn up the heat and add the white wine, stirring until the wine has evaporated

5

Remove the woody asparagus ends from the stock with a slotted spoon and discard them. Lower the heat to moderate and start adding the stock to the rice, one ladleful at a time. Stir and allow the rice to absorb the liquid before adding another ladleful. After 10 minutes, add the asparagus tips and sliced middles along with the peas, chopped herbs, lemon zest and juice. Continue adding the stock until the rice is cooked with a slight bite, approximately another 5–8 minutes

6

While the risotto is cooking, prepare the cod, seasoning it with salt and pepper. Heat a large non stick frying pan over a medium heat and add the olive oil. Add the fish to the pan, skin-side down. Turn the heat down and cook for 5 minutes. Add the butter to the pan and turn the fish over, cook for a further 4–6 minutes depending on the thickness of the fish, basting occasionally with butter

7

Finish the risotto by stirring in the Parmesan and seasoning to taste. Divide between four plates or bowls and top with the fish and sprigs of dill . Serve immediately.

stewed skrei with cannellini beans and chorizo

4 Mar

It’s that time of year agin , from January until late March Skrei! I just love this fish,

Norway has a long and proud seafaring heritage stretching back thousands of years, and its people have rightly earned a reputation for harvesting some of the finest seafood in the world.

But every winter, something remarkable happens off Norway’s northern reaches that gives its fishing communities – and seafood lovers everywhere – particular cause for celebration Driven by instinct, great multitudes of cod return from the depths of the Barents Sea to their original spawning grounds all the way off the coast of northern Norway.

These cod arrive in their prime, groomed to perfection by their epic 1000 km swim through freezing, turbulent waters. This heroic journey gives them incredible flesh that’s unsurpassed in taste and texture, flaking off in sumptuous meaty chunks.

Skrei is thought to be one of Norway’s first exports, with its arrival each year enabling Norwegians to live in northern territories when other food sources were scarce. For this reason it’s known affectionately as the “Norwegian Miracle”. It’s also known as the “Valentine’s Fish”, because it spends its life preparing for its long journey to breeding grounds. But the word ‘Skrei’ actually comes from the old Norse word for wanderer, which is fitting for a migrating fish.What makes Skrei so unique?

• Its beautifully white, light and lean flesh

• Firm flakes, a texture earned during its long swim

• Its delicate, silky smooth flavour

• The clean taste that comes from swimming in the cold, clear waters of Norway.

This stew combines the delicate flavour and robust texture of Norwegian Skrei cod with cannellini beans and chorizo.

INGREDIENTS

For the skrei

• 2 Norwegian Skrei fillets (deboned and skinned)

• 175g cooking chorizo

• 2 small white onions, sliced

• 2 garlic cloves, sliced

• 70g cavolo nero, roughly chopped

• 125g cherry tomatoes, quartered

• 1 sprig thyme

• I lemon zested and juiced

• 1 sprig rosemary chopped

• 200ml fish stock

• 2 tbsp olive oil

For the cannellini beans

• Dried cannellini beans

• 1 carrot, peeled

• ½ shallot

• 1 tsp sea salt

• Salt and pepper

METHOD

 

1. The day before you want to cook this dish, soak the beans in cold water for at least 5 hours. Once doubled in size, drain and rinse.

2. Place in a large pan with the veggies, season and cover with cold water. Bring to the boil, scoop off any foam and reduce heat to a gentle simmer.

3. Cover pan and cook for approximately 1 hour, adding more water if it gets too low. Once tender, strain and discard the cooked carrot and shallot.

4. Slice the chorizo into bitesize morsels. Sear in a frying pan over med-high heat for 3 minutes on each side (no fat needed). Remove chorizo from pan and set aside on kitchen paper.

5. Use the fat left in pan to sear the onions, garlic and cavolo nero. Cook for about 4 minutes until tender.

6. Then add the tomatoes and cook for a further 5 minutes until softened.

7. Finally, add the cooked beans, chorizo, thyme, rosemary,stock, lemon zest and juice together with the Skrei.

8. Reduce heat to a gentle simmer and cook for approximately 8 minutes. Season to taste and discard the sprig of thyme before serving.

 

9. Plate simply with the Skrei placed over a good bed of the stew

Roasted skrei (Norwegian cod) with fennel, red onion, black olives and balsamic tomatoe

9 Feb

Roasted sjrei (Norwegian cod) with fennel, red onion, black olives and balsamic tomatoeimage

What is Skrei? image Skrei is seasonal Norwegian cod at its very best. It comes from the world’s largest cod stock that lives in the Barents Sea—the Northeast Arctic cod stock (Gadus morhua). When the cod reaches maturity (at around 5 years old) it spends the winter months migrating to the coast of Norway to spawn. The cod spends most of its life in the nutrient-rich Barents Sea, but when it migrates to the coast, the cod is actually returning to its birthplace. When the cod comes to the coast to spawn, we call it Skrei. Skrei is therefore a Norwegian cod in the prime of its life.
Skrei is a Norwegian delicacy. Every winter for thousands of years, the Skrei has returned to its birthplace to spawn. This great phenomenon takes place only in Norway.
My recipe uses this delicious fish in a Mediterranean style dish, fennel, tomatoes,olives and balsamic vinegar, a one pan dish that looks fabulous placed on the middle of your dining table for everyone to tuck in too.

INGREDIENTSimage
1 large fennel bulb, trimmed and thinly sliced, fennel fronds reserved
1 large red onion, sliced
1-2 small red chillies, thinly sliced (optional)
2 tbsp olive oil
Juice of 1 lemon and zest
200g cherry tomatoes, halved
Handful sliced black olives
3 tbsp balsamic vinegarimage4 thick cod fillets skrei
1 heaped tbsp capers, drained and rinsed

METHOD
1. Preheat the oven to 200°C/fan180°C/gas 6. Scatter the fennel, olives, onion and chilli in a roasting tin and drizzle with 1 tbsp olive oil and the lemon juice. Roast for 10 minutes.

2. Scatter over the cherry tomatoes , lemon zest and roast for a further 5 minutes, then drizzle with the balsamic vinegar. Place the cod fillets on top, drizzle with the remaining oil, season and roast for 10-12minutes until the cod is just cooked through.

3. Garnish with capers and fennel fronds serve with hot crusty bread to mop up all the juices.image

For more info call or mail @ 0031(0)642297107 Simon.bingham@simons-sauces.comimage

Fried cod loin ( Skrei the Norwegian cod ) with white bean purée and garlic crisps

15 Feb

Fried cod loin ( skrei the Norwegian cod ) with white bean purée and garlic crispsimage
Skrei is the name for adult winter cod from the Barents Sea northwest of Norway where it migrates to spawn. This sustainable fish It is a delicacy which is looked forward too at the beginning of the year The cod travels from December to April from the Barents Sea to the warmer waters around Lofoten in the north of Norway to spawn . The migration ensures for a lean, tender and flaky fish.image

image
Skrei is therefore a Norwegian cod in the prime of its life, in fact, the word Skrei comes from the Norse word “skrida” which means to wander or walk.
Skrie’s premium quality is preserved through strict grading guidelines on size, maturity, location and appearance. It’s then packaged within 12 hours of being caught, and branded with the SKREI® logo to guarantee you’re getting the best sustainable product.

A real Norwegian fish supper is the marvellous mølje, a traditional trio of poached skrei, cod’s roe and cod’s liver, cooked up with onions in its own oil. Served simply with boiled potatoes and crispbread, the hearty family meal is often washed down with a shot or two of aquavit (a Scandinavian spirit distilled from potatoes) and followed by a little nap💤image
Fried cod loin ( Skreithe Norwegian cod ) with white bean purée and garlic crispsThe recipe is taken from the fantastic chef Daniel Galmiche who was on the BBC’s Saturday kitchen dated 07-02-2015.

Ingredients
image
For the white bean purée
150g/5½oz dried butter beans , soaked overnight, drained and rinsed.
1 carrot, peeled, cut into quarters
1 shallot, cut into quarters
1 garlic clove, crushed
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp chopped flat leaf parsley
1 lime, zest and juice
For the garlic crisps
Sunflower oil for frying
100ml/3½fl oz full-fat milk
4 large garlic cloves, thinly sliced
3 tbsp plain flour
Sea salt and ground pepper
For the cod
8 garlic cloves, unpeeled
4 cod ( skrei ) loins, about 150g/5½oz each, skin on, patted dry
40g/1½oz unsalted butter
2 tbsp olive oil

Method

1. For the purée, put the butter beans in a saucepan, cover with cold water and bring to the boil over a high heat, skimming off any foam the rises to the surface. Add the carrot, shallot and garlic, turn the heat down to a simmer, partially cover and cook for 40 minutes until tender.
Strain the beans, reserving 4 tablespoons of the cooking liquid. Discard the carrot, shallot and garlic. Put the beans in a blender with 3 tablespoons of the cooking liquid and blend to a smooth purée. Add the extra virgin olive oil and blend again. Add the remaining cooking liquid if the purée is too thick. Season with salt and pepper, then stir in the parsley, half the lime zest and all of the lime juice.image
2. For the garlic crisps, heat a deep, heavy-bottomed saucepan with enough sunflower oil to deep-fry the garlic. Heat to 160C/315F, or until a cube of bread browns in 45 seconds. Alternatively, use a deep-fat fryer. (CAUTION: hot oil can be dangerous. Do not leave unattended.)image

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Meanwhile bring the milk to a gentle boil in a small saucepan, add the sliced garlic and blanch for 2-3 minutes until softened slightly but not breaking up. Remove and pat dry with kitchen paper. Discard the milk.
Lightly dust the garlic in the flour, then carefully drop a few slices at a time into the hot oil and fry for 2-3 minutes until golden-brown and crisp. Drain on kitchen paper. Season with salt and set aside.
3. For the cod, blanch the garlic cloves in a small saucepan of boiling water for 4-8 minutes until softened, then drain. Refresh in cold water and pat dry with kitchen paper.image
Season the skin of the cod with salt and pepper. Heat a lidded non-stick frying pan over a high heat. Add the butter and olive oil. When the butter is foaming, add the cod, skin side down, and cook for 3-5 minutes, or until the skin is crisp and golden. imageTurn the heat down to medium-low, add the blanched garlic cloves, partially cover with the lid and cook for 3-4 minutes. Remove the lid, turn the fish over and cook for a further 2-3 minutes until just cooked through.
Serve the cod on a bed of the bean purée with the buttery garlic sauce spooned over the top. Sprinkle with garlic crisps and the remaining lime zest before serving.image
For more info call or mail inquires to: 0031 (0)642297107
simon.bingham@simons-sauces.comimage

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