Spiced Fig and Plum Tarte Tatin

16 Sep

Spiced Fig and Plum Tarte Tatin

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It’s autumn again and this gives us more wonderful fruit, apples, pears, plums and delicious ripe plump figs. So what to with all that extra fruit? Well I’ve a really tasty desert for every one with a sweet tooth ” my spiced fig tarte Tatin ”

Now what is a ” Tarte Tatin ” ?
Tarte Tatin is a famous French upside-down apple tart (actually a sweet upside-down cake , apples are the traditional filling but other fruits can be used) made by covering the bottom of a shallow baking dish with butter and sugar, then apples and finally a pastry crust. While baking, the sugar and butter create a delicious caramel that becomes the topping when the tart is inverted onto a serving plate.

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There is one rule for eating Tarte Tatin, which is scrupulously observed. It must be served warm, so the cream melts on contact. To the French, a room temperature Tarte Tatin isn’t worth the pan it was baked in.

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My Tarte Tatin is made with figs, plums, nuts and spices which is a delicious twist on the original!
Here are a few fun facts and trivia about figs .

Although dried figs are available throughout the year, there is nothing like the unique taste and texture of fresh figs. They are lusciously sweet with a texture that combines the chewiness of their flesh, the smoothness of their skin, and the crunchiness of their seeds. Figsare available from June through September

Fig trees have no blossoms on their branches. The blossom is inside of the fruit! Many tiny flowers produce the crunchy little edible seeds that give figs their unique texture.

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Figs are harvested according to nature’s clock, fully ripened and partially dried on the tree.

Many believe it was figs that were actually the fruit in the Garden of Eden with Adam and Eve, not apples.

The early Olympic athletes used figs as a training food. Figs were also presented as laurels to the winners, becoming the first Olympic “medal.

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In Roman times figs were considered to be restorative. They were believed to increase the strength of young people, to maintain the elderly in better health and to make them look younger with fewer wrinkles

The fig tree is a symbol of abundance, fertility and sweetness.

Eating one half cup of figs has as much calcium as drinking one-half cup of milk.

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Ingredients

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500g block puff pastry
plain flour, for dusting
200g golden caster sugar
100 g unsalted mixed chopped nuts
2 tsp ground allspice
80g butter
4 star anise
10 figs, halved
3 plums pitted and halved

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Method

1, Roll out the puff pastry on a floured surface to about a 3mm thickness.

2, Place the pan that you’ll use – about 24cm – on top and cut round it with a sharp knife to make a pastry circle, Sprinkle the circle with a little of the sugar and put it into the fridge.

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3, Heat the oven to 220C/fan 200C/gas 7. Put the remaining sugar and butter in a pan. Bring to the boil slowly, but do not stir it. When it begins to go a dark amber colour, add the star anise, allspice and cook for 1 minute more, then take from the heat

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4, Put the figs and plums in with the stem pointing towards the centre to make a wheel pattern sprinkle over half of the nuts and cook over a low heat for 5 mins

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5, Put the pastry lid on the top and tuck the pastry in as though you were tucking in some sheets. Put on a baking sheet and cook in the oven for 15-20 minutes, or until the pastry is golden, puffed and cooked through.

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6′ Take out of the oven and leave the tart to stand for 10 mins, then invert it carefully onto a serving dish, sprinkle over the remaining nuts and serve with crème fraîche or ice cream😋.

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If you’re still nervous about trying this dish I can cook it for you !🍴🔪
For mor info don’t hesitate to mail or call:
simon.bingham@simons-sauces.com 0031 (0)642297107

One Response to “Spiced Fig and Plum Tarte Tatin”

  1. Stephen R 06/10/2013 at 21:08 #

    Nice take on a classic! Omitted the spices but added 12 cardomen pods during the caramel stage with mine (then removed them when the figs went in!!) and made a rose water and pistachio ice cream to go with. V tasty!!

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